Lessons from Asia: Fyber’s Panel at Casual Connect Europe

By Stephanie Newman
Friday, February 21, 2014 / 1 min read

Last week, Fyber (formerly SponsorPay) set up shop at Casual Connect Europe. Housed in the architecturally famous Beurs van Berlage venue in Amsterdam, the event was buzzing right and left with great information about the gaming industry. (Perhaps the great conversations were fueled by the Fyber (formerly SponsorPay) branded energy drinks we handed out at our booth!) Topics ranged from tips on creating great audio for iOS games, to funding strategies for indie developers, to our favorite subject: mobile ad monetization.

We hosted our own panel, called “Success in Asia: Lessons from Industry Leaders in China, Japan, and South Korea,” moderated by our Director of Developer Relations for EMEA, Tomas Piktozis (who also gave a great Casual Connect interview the next day). Asian market experts Charlie Moseley of Tap4Fun, Jaime Ocampo of DeNA, and David Kim of Animoca shared their insights, the most important of which were:

  1. Each Asian market is extremely different. China, Japan, and South Korea can’t be lumped together into a single market when you think about gaming in Asia.
  2. If you’re looking to break into the Chinese market, you should absolutely partner with a Chinese gaming company that can help you . You should also be working on Android and know that freemium apps reign supreme in China.
  3. In South Korea, virality is part of the culture. Trends go viral with the blink of an eye. Trends that take weeks to sweep the U.S. can sweep South Korea within 24 hours – and often, the most viral games are created by South Korean locals. Even foreign developers who create successful games for the South Korean market are often outdone by locals who release better versions of their games a short time later.
  4. Don’t overlook Southeast Asian markets like Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore, which all have their own regional ins-and-outs. In fact, WeChat, Kakao, and LINE are all competing for Southeast Asia as their next battleground. Developers should know: Thailand and Vietnam have cheap user acquisition costs and LTV; you can acquire huge numbers of users there, but Southeast Asia not a gold mine in terms of monetization. Still, there’s room to go and establish yourself in Southeast Asian counties for the next 5 years of growth. Singapore and Malaysia are logistically the friendliest because of their large English-speaking demographics.

Be sure to watch our full panel to learn more about mobile gaming in Asia!

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